San Francisco Giants Maritime Bay Cruise

Click here to enter exhibit

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E50 - San Francisco Giants Enterprises
E50 - San Francisco Giants Enterprises

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E50 - Map of Cruise Route SF Giants
E50 - Map of Cruise Route SF Giants

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E50 - 1781 Canizares Map of San Francisco Bay
E50 - 1781 Canizares Map of San Francisco Bay

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E50 - 1833 San Francisco Bay Map by Beechey
E50 - 1833 San Francisco Bay Map by Beechey

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E50 - Timeline of Early San Francisco History
E50 - Timeline of Early San Francisco History

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E50 - 1848 Yerba Buena Cove JC Ward
E50 - 1848 Yerba Buena Cove JC Ward

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E50 - 1850 Map San Francisco  with Apollo Store Ship
E50 - 1850 Map San Francisco with Apollo Store Ship

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E50 - Yerba Buena
E50 - Yerba Buena

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E50 - 1848 Gold Region Larkin
E50 - 1848 Gold Region Larkin

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E50 - Gold Rush
E50 - Gold Rush

11

E50 - 1850 San Francisco Post Office
E50 - 1850 San Francisco Post Office

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E50 California joins the Union September 9, 1850
E50 California joins the Union September 9, 1850

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E50 - 1852 Tall Ships in Yerba Buena Cove
E50 - 1852 Tall Ships in Yerba Buena Cove

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E50 - 1850 San Francisco Hotel Niantic
E50 - 1850 San Francisco Hotel Niantic

15

E50 - 2017 San Francisco Buried Ships Michael Warner
E50 - 2017 San Francisco Buried Ships Michael Warner

16

E50 - Buried Ships of Downtown San Francisco
E50 - Buried Ships of Downtown San Francisco

17

E50 - Alexander Cartwright
E50 - Alexander Cartwright

18

E50 - San Francisco Ballparks 1
E50 - San Francisco Ballparks 1

19

E50 - San Francisco Ballparks Map
E50 - San Francisco Ballparks Map

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E50 - San Francisco Ballparks 2
E50 - San Francisco Ballparks 2

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E50 Map of Cruise 2
E50 Map of Cruise 2

22

E50 - Bay Bridge Construction
E50 - Bay Bridge Construction

23

E50 - Treasure Island Construction and Possible Use
E50 - Treasure Island Construction and Possible Use

24

E50 - San Francisco Treasure Island 1939 Ruth Taylor White
E50 - San Francisco Treasure Island 1939 Ruth Taylor White

25

E50 - Pan Am Clipper
E50 - Pan Am Clipper

26

E50 - 1833 San Francisco Bay Map by Beechey
E50 - 1833 San Francisco Bay Map by Beechey

27

E50 - Alcatraz
E50 - Alcatraz

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E50 Map of Cruise 3
E50 Map of Cruise 3

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E50 - Angel Island
E50 - Angel Island

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E50 Map of Cruise 4
E50 Map of Cruise 4

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E50 - Tiburon
E50 - Tiburon

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E50 Map of Cruise 5
E50 Map of Cruise 5

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E50 - Muir Woods
E50 - Muir Woods

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E50 - Sausalito
E50 - Sausalito

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E50 Map of Cruise 6
E50 Map of Cruise 6

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E50 - Golden Gate Bridge
E50 - Golden Gate Bridge

37

E37 - San Francisco, by Chevalier, 1915 B&W
E37 - San Francisco, by Chevalier, 1915 B&W

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E50 - Pan Pacific International Exposition (PPIE)
E50 - Pan Pacific International Exposition (PPIE)

39

E50 - SF 1906 Earthquake at Grant and Post Avenues
E50 - SF 1906 Earthquake at Grant and Post Avenues

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E50 - 1906 San Francisco Burn Area
E50 - 1906 San Francisco Burn Area

41

E50 Map of Cruise 7
E50 Map of Cruise 7

42

E37 - San Francisco, by Harrison Godwin, 1927
E37 - San Francisco, by Harrison Godwin, 1927

43

E50 - Fisherman's Wharf
E50 - Fisherman's Wharf

44

E50 - San Francisco Butler 1864
E50 - San Francisco Butler 1864

45

E50 - 1937 Views of Future Site of SF Giants Ballpark
E50 - 1937 Views of Future Site of SF Giants Ballpark

46

E50 - SF Giants Ballpark on Google Maps Satellite
E50 - SF Giants Ballpark on Google Maps Satellite

47

E50 - SF Giants Baseball Stadium Development 8
E50 - SF Giants Baseball Stadium Development 8

48

E50 - Construction
E50 - Construction

49

E50 - The Coke Bottle
E50 - The Coke Bottle

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E50 - A Ballpark Connected To The Water
E50 - A Ballpark Connected To The Water

51

E50 - McCovey Cove Night Game at Oracle Ballpark SF Giants
E50 - McCovey Cove Night Game at Oracle Ballpark SF Giants

52

E50 Map of Cruise 8
E50 Map of Cruise 8

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E50 - SF Giants Ballpark view of Bay
E50 - SF Giants Ballpark view of Bay

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E50 - SF Giants Slide with Logo 2
E50 - SF Giants Slide with Logo 2
Image 1 of 54 | Image: 259 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - San Francisco Giants Enterprises

Welcome to the San Francisco Giants world class waterfront enterprises! At the intersection of sports, entertainment, meetings, events, tourism and hospitality, Giants Enterprises provides the rare combination of people and places to create new memories and great impressions. You can journey on the luxurious California Spirit around the San Francisco Bay and experience the rich history of the Bay Area. Beginning at Pier 40, right next door to the famous AT&T ballpark, home to the San Francisco Giants, you’ll cruise under the Bay Bridge, past Alcatraz, around Angel Island and Tiburon, see Sausalito, cruise under the Golden Gate Bridge, and then return alongside Fisherman’s Wharf, before heading back to Pier 40 and a magnificent view of the ballpark.

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Image 2 of 54 | Image: 261 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 - Map of Cruise Route SF Giants

Map of Cruise Route SF Giants

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Image 3 of 54 | Image: 297 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 - 1781 Canizares Map of San Francisco Bay
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Image 4 of 54 | Image: 249 | Size: 6643x4677px E50 - 1833 San Francisco Bay Map by Beechey

Early seafaring explorers from Spain, France and England sailed their ships along the West coast of America and often past the entrance to San Francisco Bay because it was shrouded in fog. Originally settled by Ohlone-speaking Yelamu tribe, San Francisco would be mapped by Spanish explorer Don Gaspar de Portolá in 1769 and later become a Spanish colony in 1776, with missions established throughout the area. Once the Bay had been properly explored and mapped out for navigation, Europeans began to settle within its boundaries and take advantage of the many natural resources they discovered. In 1821, Mexico gained independence from Spain and they renamed the small port town Yerba Buena. As seen in this detailed map, sailing into the Bay became easier with the aid of images like this one from 1833. It would not be until the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848 that the Bay and surrounding areas became part of the United States.

“Very rare and important chart of San Francisco Bay, the result of the first scientific mapping of the Bay. The chart had a wide influence upon later maps of the area. The chart, with copies and adaptations of it, served to the end of the Mexican period and formed the substantial basis of the earliest ones produced under the American regime. It was deficient only in the region beyond Carquinez Strait. The chart of the entrance contains additional hydrographic data pertinent to entering the port and reaching the chief places of anchorage. Accompanying the chart are elevation views depicting the approaches to the bay and the hazards to navigation.” davidrumsey.com

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Image 6 of 54 | Image: 253 | Size: 1877x1253px E50 - 1848 Yerba Buena Cove JC Ward

1848 Pre Gold Rush San Francisco - JC Ward

Here we can see the bucolic Yerba Buena Cove before the San Francisco Gold Rush began in earnest. In fact, San Francisco was named after this local "good flower" from the mint family, and had a population of only a few hundred persons on average during the Mexican era from 1821-1848. As the main port for ships coming into the Bay, Yerba Buena Cove is now the area of present-day downtown San Francisco and is one of the first places you will see while on this cruise.

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Image 7 of 54 | Image: 254 | Size: 5907x7324px E50 - 1850 Map San Francisco with Apollo Store Ship

Yerba Buena cove, also swelled with ships. The frenzy was so great that many ships would dock in Yerba Buena cove and then be left behind by the crew and the owners, who were all seeking their fortune in the hills.

Rumsey

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Image 9 of 54 | Image: 258 | Size: 5841x7180px E50 - 1848 Gold Region Larkin

David Rumsey Library @ Stanford

This map is important because it was the first one to be widely printed and show the locations of gold mines in California. Made by an enterprising merchant and later U.S. Consul to the Republic of California, Thomas Oliver Larkin spurred the Gold Rush of 1849 and forever altered the course of history in the San Francisco Bay.

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Image 10 of 54 | Image: 271 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - Gold Rush

Don Brown book cover

Handbill - Wikipedia

Gold Rush - Wikipedia

Don Brown gold rush image used with permission of Don Brown.

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Image 11 of 54 | Image: 256 | Size: 3358x2686px E50 - 1850 San Francisco Post Office

NYPL 1850 San Francisco Post Office

The discovery of gold in 1849 completely transformed the city. San Francisco was overrun with people seeking their fortune in the eastern hills across the Bay. The city's sleepy population swelled from 800 to 25,000 in a matter of months. This image shows a post office swarmed by individuals hoping to change their lives with a nugget of gold. Over 300,000 prospectors came to the Bay area during the period of 1848-1852, with half of them arriving by sea. During this time, California began to build its infrastructure and officially became a State in the Union on September 9th, 1850.

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Image 13 of 54 | Image: 255 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - 1852 Tall Ships in Yerba Buena Cove
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Image 14 of 54 | Image: 252 | Size: 4000x3142px E50 - 1850 San Francisco Hotel Niantic
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Image 15 of 54 | Image: 250 | Size: 3600x2700px E50 - 2017 San Francisco Buried Ships Michael Warner

"Beneath contemporary streets of San Francisco lie the remains of many sailing ships that brought people to San Francisco during the gold rush that began in 1849. The ships have different stories, but many were used at storage as the city's shoreline was expanded outward around them by landfill--some of these and other abandoned ships burned in fires and were buried afterward." San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park

Map by Michael Warner

Image in the public domain per Michael Warner.

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Image 16 of 54 | Image: 251 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - Buried Ships of Downtown San Francisco

https://thebolditalic.com/what-lies-beneath-the-bu...

Image of ship General Harrison used with permission of James Delgado.

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Image 17 of 54 | Image: 263 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - Alexander Cartwright
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Image 18 of 54 | Image: 272 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - San Francisco Ballparks 1
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Image 19 of 54 | Image: 293 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - San Francisco Ballparks Map

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baseball_(ball)

Portsmouth Square: https://ourgame.mlblogs.com/the-knickerbockers-san...

Recreation Grounds: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreation_Park_(San_Francisco)

Haight Street Grounds: https://hoodline.com/2016/03/the-forgotten-history...

Central Park: https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=View_South...

Ewing Field: https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=Ewing_Fiel...

Seals Stadium: SF Giants

Candlestick Park: SF Giants

Oracle Park: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Park#/

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Image 20 of 54 | Image: 273 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - San Francisco Ballparks 2

Ewing Field: https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=Ewing_Fiel...

Seals Stadium: SF Giants

Candlestick Park: SF Giants

Oracle Park: Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Park#/

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Image 21 of 54 | Image: 281 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 Map of Cruise 2

E50 Map of Cruise 2

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Image 22 of 54 | Image: 264 | Size: 1000x737px E50 - Bay Bridge Construction
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Image 23 of 54 | Image: 265 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - Treasure Island Construction and Possible Use
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Image 24 of 54 | Image: 266 | Size: 9542x7960px E50 - San Francisco Treasure Island 1939 Ruth Taylor White

“Born in 1899, Ruth Taylor and her family, like many, headed persistently west in the late 19th century, moving from East Coast to West in the span of about 20 years and finally settling in California. According to the 1920 US Census, Taylor seemed to be settling into a pretty normal life--she was married to Leonard White and living in Phoenix, Arizona. Leonard was a life insurance salesman. Two kids followed, and so did divorce. With limited information, it’s easy to fill in the gaps and imagine a disastrous mismatch of temperaments, but all we know is that Ruth and her children moved to California and she began working as an illustrator. Ruth’s artistic training is unclear, but her family proved to be very important in her future work. Several of her early jobs were linked to her brother, Frank J. Taylor (1894-1972). Frank was a journalist and writer, served in World War I, and attended Stanford University. That school connection probably helped Ruth earn one of her early commissions, the cover of the November 1927 The Stanford Illustrated Review.” swaen.com

Davidrumsey.com printsellers.com newspapers.com

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Image 25 of 54 | Image: 267 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - Pan Am Clipper

Upper left and lower left: https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=The_China_... and Collection of San Francisco Airport Museums

Upper right: https://www.loc.gov/resource/ds.13935/

Lower right: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_314_Clipper

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Image 26 of 54 | Image: 296 | Size: 6643x4677px E50 - 1833 San Francisco Bay Map by Beechey

Early seafaring explorers from Spain, France and England sailed their ships along the West coast of America and often past the entrance to San Francisco Bay because it was shrouded in fog. Originally settled by Ohlone-speaking Yelamu tribe, San Francisco would be mapped by Spanish explorer Don Gaspar de Portolá in 1769 and later become a Spanish colony in 1776, with missions established throughout the area. Once the Bay had been properly explored and mapped out for navigation, Europeans began to settle within its boundaries and take advantage of the many natural resources they discovered. In 1821, Mexico gained independence from Spain and they renamed the small port town Yerba Buena. As seen in this detailed map, sailing into the Bay became easier with the aid of images like this one from 1833. It would not be until the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848 that the Bay and surrounding areas became part of the United States.

“Very rare and important chart of San Francisco Bay, the result of the first scientific mapping of the Bay. The chart had a wide influence upon later maps of the area. The chart, with copies and adaptations of it, served to the end of the Mexican period and formed the substantial basis of the earliest ones produced under the American regime. It was deficient only in the region beyond Carquinez Strait. The chart of the entrance contains additional hydrographic data pertinent to entering the port and reaching the chief places of anchorage. Accompanying the chart are elevation views depicting the approaches to the bay and the hazards to navigation.” davidrumsey.com

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Image 28 of 54 | Image: 282 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 Map of Cruise 3

E50 Map of Cruise 3

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Image 30 of 54 | Image: 283 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 Map of Cruise 4

E50 Map of Cruise 4

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Image 31 of 54 | Image: 277 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - Tiburon
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Image 32 of 54 | Image: 284 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 Map of Cruise 5

E50 Map of Cruise 5

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Image 33 of 54 | Image: 279 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - Muir Woods
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Image 35 of 54 | Image: 285 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 Map of Cruise 6

E50 Map of Cruise 6

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Image 36 of 54 | Image: 278 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - Golden Gate Bridge
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Image 37 of 54 | Image: 94 | Size: 6756x6328px E37 - San Francisco, by Chevalier, 1915 B&W

“Map of San Francisco on sheet 47x54, folded in paper covers 18x8. Copyrighted by August Chevalier, 1915. Shows the "Ground plan of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Relief shown by contours. Includes legend. Shows wards, city blocks, streets, railroads, bridges, tunnels, places of interest, important buildings are drawn in vignettes. Includes index to places of interest at the lower panel and index to theatres, railway depots and post offices at upper right. "Car lines" shown in red. Includes index and text on verso. See our other maps of San Francisco by Chevalier, from which this map is taken.” davidrumsey.com

“August Chevalier (fl. c. 1903 – 1932) was a San Francisco based lithographer active in the first decades of the 20th century. Chevalier is a remarkably elusive figure and little is known of his personal or professional life. He is best known for his large and magnificent topographical map of San Francisco boldly known as 'The Chevalier.' His few other maps also, almost exclusively, focus on San Francisco and the surrounding communities.” geographicus.com

wired.com

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Image 38 of 54 | Image: 274 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - Pan Pacific International Exposition (PPIE)
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Image 39 of 54 | Image: 262 | Size: 2367x1500px E50 - SF 1906 Earthquake at Grant and Post Avenues

E50 SF 1906 Earthquake at Grant and Post Avenues

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1906_San_Francisco_e...

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Image 40 of 54 | Image: 257 | Size: 8381x6191px E50 - 1906 San Francisco Burn Area

“A map of the area of San Francisco burned in the 1906 earthquake, with a overlay half-toned in red of the dramatic fire. The map appears to have been derived from one published in Leslie's Magazine shortly after the earthquake. See ID #1154, "Destruction of One of the Greatest Modern Cities" (1906). A comparison of these two images shows how the use of color and graphics can dramatically change the impact of a map. Despite the sensationalist impression conveyed by Lee's map, the text legend ("Plain Facts") emphasizes that "the beautiful Golden Gate city" has not been "entirely destroyed" and the "new San Francisco will be grander and more beautiful." See also ID #1155, "Ideal Picture and Map of San Francisco," 1906. This map is tipped into the front of Searight's book, published by the publishers of the map, Laird & Lee. However, the map is mentioned nowhere in the book, nor does it appear in the lengthy "List of Illustrations" in the book. It appears that the map was added after publication, which explains why it is found only in a small number of copies. Red is often used to emphasize the significance of fire or other hazards.” PJ Mode

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Image 41 of 54 | Image: 286 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 Map of Cruise 7

E50 Map of Cruise 7

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Image 42 of 54 | Image: 62 | Size: 8486x6871px E37 - San Francisco, by Harrison Godwin, 1927

“Unlike many other antique maps of San Francisco, this one is covered in illustrations highlighting points of interest and historical events. The streets are essentially the same and they’re all labeled well enough that you can see if your apartment used to be a cemetery, a slaughterhouse, or an old railroad car barn. The map was originally mass-produced for tourists and I’ve seen a few different copies online. One was found in the forgotten depths of someone’s closet in 2011, and a Redditor mentioned in the comment thread that they had an original framed copy on their wall at home. In 2012, a copy of the map sold on eBay for $1,400.” The Bold Italic

“Harrison Godwin (1899 - 1984) was an American cartoonist and hotelier active in California during the early to middle parts of the 20th century. Harrison was a cartoonist with the Los Angeles Examiner and published two daily strips. With regard to cartographic material he published just three maps, San Francisco, Hollywood and North America, all between the years of 1927 and 1929. The San Francisco and Hollywood maps were first and second maps in a planned series of American cities, each taking some three months to complete. Curiously, no further maps in the series materialized. In addition to his cartoon work Harrison, in partnership with his brother Fred, owned Carmel's La Playa Hotel, where Harrison worked as a manager. Harrison and Fred Godwin and are credited with popularizing Carmel as a tourist destination. Little else is known of his life.” geographicus.com

davidrumsey.com

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Image 44 of 54 | Image: 299 | Size: 11181x9702px E50 - San Francisco Butler 1864

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Image 45 of 54 | Image: 295 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - 1937 Views of Future Site of SF Giants Ballpark
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Image 46 of 54 | Image: 291 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - SF Giants Ballpark on Google Maps Satellite

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Image 47 of 54 | Image: 260 | Size: 2800x2000px E50 - SF Giants Baseball Stadium Development 8

SF Giants Baseball Stadium Development 8

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Image 48 of 54 | Image: 288 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - Construction

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Image 49 of 54 | Image: 289 | Size: 1280x720px E50 - The Coke Bottle

Upper middle, upper right: San Francisco Giants (Chris Koenig)

Upper left, lower middle, lower right: https://scientificartstudio.com/san-francisco-gian...

Lower left: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Park

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Image 50 of 54 | Image: 290 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - A Ballpark Connected To The Water

Upper right: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCovey_Cove

Upper left, lower middle, lower right: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Park

Lower left: SF Giants (Chris Koenig, Brad Martens, Suzanna Mitchell)

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Image 51 of 54 | Image: 270 | Size: 7056x1896px E50 - McCovey Cove Night Game at Oracle Ballpark SF Giants
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Image 52 of 54 | Image: 287 | Size: 1275x1650px E50 Map of Cruise 8

E50 Map of Cruise 8

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Image 53 of 54 | Image: 269 | Size: 4769x2063px E50 - SF Giants Ballpark view of Bay
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Image 54 of 54 | Image: 300 | Size: 1920x1080px E50 - SF Giants Slide with Logo 2

ct

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E50 - San Francisco Giants Enterprises

Welcome to the San Francisco Giants world class waterfront enterprises! At the intersection of sports, entertainment, meetings, events, tourism and hospitality, Giants Enterprises provides the rare combination of people and places to create new memories and great impressions. You can journey on the luxurious California Spirit around the San Francisco Bay and experience the rich history of the Bay Area. Beginning at Pier 40, right next door to the famous AT&T ballpark, home to the San Francisco Giants, you’ll cruise under the Bay Bridge, past Alcatraz, around Angel Island and Tiburon, see Sausalito, cruise under the Golden Gate Bridge, and then return alongside Fisherman’s Wharf, before heading back to Pier 40 and a magnificent view of the ballpark.

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Image 1 of 54
Image: 259
Size: 1920x1080px
E50 - Map of Cruise Route SF Giants

Map of Cruise Route SF Giants

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Image 2 of 54
Image: 261
Size: 1275x1650px
E50 - 1781 Canizares Map of San Francisco Bay
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Image 3 of 54
Image: 297
Size: 1275x1650px
E50 - 1833 San Francisco Bay Map by Beechey

Early seafaring explorers from Spain, France and England sailed their ships along the West coast of America and often past the entrance to San Francisco Bay because it was shrouded in fog. Originally settled by Ohlone-speaking Yelamu tribe, San Francisco would be mapped by Spanish explorer Don Gaspar de Portolá in 1769 and later become a Spanish colony in 1776, with missions established throughout the area. Once the Bay had been properly explored and mapped out for navigation, Europeans began to settle within its boundaries and take advantage of the many natural resources they discovered. In 1821, Mexico gained independence from Spain and they renamed the small port town Yerba Buena. As seen in this detailed map, sailing into the Bay became easier with the aid of images like this one from 1833. It would not be until the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848 that the Bay and surrounding areas became part of the United States.

“Very rare and important chart of San Francisco Bay, the result of the first scientific mapping of the Bay. The chart had a wide influence upon later maps of the area. The chart, with copies and adaptations of it, served to the end of the Mexican period and formed the substantial basis of the earliest ones produced under the American regime. It was deficient only in the region beyond Carquinez Strait. The chart of the entrance contains additional hydrographic data pertinent to entering the port and reaching the chief places of anchorage. Accompanying the chart are elevation views depicting the approaches to the bay and the hazards to navigation.” davidrumsey.com

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Image 4 of 54
Image: 249
Size: 6643x4677px
E50 - 1848 Yerba Buena Cove JC Ward

1848 Pre Gold Rush San Francisco - JC Ward

Here we can see the bucolic Yerba Buena Cove before the San Francisco Gold Rush began in earnest. In fact, San Francisco was named after this local "good flower" from the mint family, and had a population of only a few hundred persons on average during the Mexican era from 1821-1848. As the main port for ships coming into the Bay, Yerba Buena Cove is now the area of present-day downtown San Francisco and is one of the first places you will see while on this cruise.

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Image 6 of 54
Image: 253
Size: 1877x1253px
E50 - 1850 Map San Francisco with Apollo Store Ship

Yerba Buena cove, also swelled with ships. The frenzy was so great that many ships would dock in Yerba Buena cove and then be left behind by the crew and the owners, who were all seeking their fortune in the hills.

Rumsey

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Image 7 of 54
Image: 254
Size: 5907x7324px
E50 - 1848 Gold Region Larkin

David Rumsey Library @ Stanford

This map is important because it was the first one to be widely printed and show the locations of gold mines in California. Made by an enterprising merchant and later U.S. Consul to the Republic of California, Thomas Oliver Larkin spurred the Gold Rush of 1849 and forever altered the course of history in the San Francisco Bay.

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Image 9 of 54
Image: 258
Size: 5841x7180px
E50 - Gold Rush

Don Brown book cover

Handbill - Wikipedia

Gold Rush - Wikipedia

Don Brown gold rush image used with permission of Don Brown.

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Image 10 of 54
Image: 271
Size: 1280x720px
E50 - 1850 San Francisco Post Office

NYPL 1850 San Francisco Post Office

The discovery of gold in 1849 completely transformed the city. San Francisco was overrun with people seeking their fortune in the eastern hills across the Bay. The city's sleepy population swelled from 800 to 25,000 in a matter of months. This image shows a post office swarmed by individuals hoping to change their lives with a nugget of gold. Over 300,000 prospectors came to the Bay area during the period of 1848-1852, with half of them arriving by sea. During this time, California began to build its infrastructure and officially became a State in the Union on September 9th, 1850.

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Image 11 of 54
Image: 256
Size: 3358x2686px
E50 - 1852 Tall Ships in Yerba Buena Cove
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Image 13 of 54
Image: 255
Size: 1920x1080px
E50 - 1850 San Francisco Hotel Niantic
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Image 14 of 54
Image: 252
Size: 4000x3142px
E50 - 2017 San Francisco Buried Ships Michael Warner

"Beneath contemporary streets of San Francisco lie the remains of many sailing ships that brought people to San Francisco during the gold rush that began in 1849. The ships have different stories, but many were used at storage as the city's shoreline was expanded outward around them by landfill--some of these and other abandoned ships burned in fires and were buried afterward." San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park

Map by Michael Warner

Image in the public domain per Michael Warner.

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Image 15 of 54
Image: 250
Size: 3600x2700px
E50 - Buried Ships of Downtown San Francisco

https://thebolditalic.com/what-lies-beneath-the-bu...

Image of ship General Harrison used with permission of James Delgado.

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Image 16 of 54
Image: 251
Size: 1280x720px

E50 - Alexander Cartwright

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Image 17 of 54
Image: 263
Size: 1280x720px
E50 - San Francisco Ballparks 1
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Image: 272
Size: 1280x720px
E50 - San Francisco Ballparks Map

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baseball_(ball)

Portsmouth Square: https://ourgame.mlblogs.com/the-knickerbockers-san...

Recreation Grounds: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recreation_Park_(San_Francisco)

Haight Street Grounds: https://hoodline.com/2016/03/the-forgotten-history...

Central Park: https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=View_South...

Ewing Field: https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=Ewing_Fiel...

Seals Stadium: SF Giants

Candlestick Park: SF Giants

Oracle Park: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Park#/

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Image 19 of 54
Image: 293
Size: 1920x1080px
E50 - San Francisco Ballparks 2

Ewing Field: https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=Ewing_Fiel...

Seals Stadium: SF Giants

Candlestick Park: SF Giants

Oracle Park: Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Park#/

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Image: 273
Size: 1920x1080px
E50 Map of Cruise 2

E50 Map of Cruise 2

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Image 21 of 54
Image: 281
Size: 1275x1650px
E50 - Bay Bridge Construction
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Image 22 of 54
Image: 264
Size: 1000x737px
E50 - Treasure Island Construction and Possible Use
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Image: 265
Size: 1920x1080px
E50 - San Francisco Treasure Island 1939 Ruth Taylor White

“Born in 1899, Ruth Taylor and her family, like many, headed persistently west in the late 19th century, moving from East Coast to West in the span of about 20 years and finally settling in California. According to the 1920 US Census, Taylor seemed to be settling into a pretty normal life--she was married to Leonard White and living in Phoenix, Arizona. Leonard was a life insurance salesman. Two kids followed, and so did divorce. With limited information, it’s easy to fill in the gaps and imagine a disastrous mismatch of temperaments, but all we know is that Ruth and her children moved to California and she began working as an illustrator. Ruth’s artistic training is unclear, but her family proved to be very important in her future work. Several of her early jobs were linked to her brother, Frank J. Taylor (1894-1972). Frank was a journalist and writer, served in World War I, and attended Stanford University. That school connection probably helped Ruth earn one of her early commissions, the cover of the November 1927 The Stanford Illustrated Review.” swaen.com

Davidrumsey.com printsellers.com newspapers.com

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E50 - Pan Am Clipper

Upper left and lower left: https://www.foundsf.org/index.php?title=The_China_... and Collection of San Francisco Airport Museums

Upper right: https://www.loc.gov/resource/ds.13935/

Lower right: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_314_Clipper

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E50 - 1833 San Francisco Bay Map by Beechey

Early seafaring explorers from Spain, France and England sailed their ships along the West coast of America and often past the entrance to San Francisco Bay because it was shrouded in fog. Originally settled by Ohlone-speaking Yelamu tribe, San Francisco would be mapped by Spanish explorer Don Gaspar de Portolá in 1769 and later become a Spanish colony in 1776, with missions established throughout the area. Once the Bay had been properly explored and mapped out for navigation, Europeans began to settle within its boundaries and take advantage of the many natural resources they discovered. In 1821, Mexico gained independence from Spain and they renamed the small port town Yerba Buena. As seen in this detailed map, sailing into the Bay became easier with the aid of images like this one from 1833. It would not be until the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848 that the Bay and surrounding areas became part of the United States.

“Very rare and important chart of San Francisco Bay, the result of the first scientific mapping of the Bay. The chart had a wide influence upon later maps of the area. The chart, with copies and adaptations of it, served to the end of the Mexican period and formed the substantial basis of the earliest ones produced under the American regime. It was deficient only in the region beyond Carquinez Strait. The chart of the entrance contains additional hydrographic data pertinent to entering the port and reaching the chief places of anchorage. Accompanying the chart are elevation views depicting the approaches to the bay and the hazards to navigation.” davidrumsey.com

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E50 Map of Cruise 3

E50 Map of Cruise 3

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E50 Map of Cruise 4

E50 Map of Cruise 4

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E50 Map of Cruise 5

E50 Map of Cruise 5

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E50 - Muir Woods
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E50 Map of Cruise 6

E50 Map of Cruise 6

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E50 - Golden Gate Bridge
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E37 - San Francisco, by Chevalier, 1915 B&W

“Map of San Francisco on sheet 47x54, folded in paper covers 18x8. Copyrighted by August Chevalier, 1915. Shows the "Ground plan of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Relief shown by contours. Includes legend. Shows wards, city blocks, streets, railroads, bridges, tunnels, places of interest, important buildings are drawn in vignettes. Includes index to places of interest at the lower panel and index to theatres, railway depots and post offices at upper right. "Car lines" shown in red. Includes index and text on verso. See our other maps of San Francisco by Chevalier, from which this map is taken.” davidrumsey.com

“August Chevalier (fl. c. 1903 – 1932) was a San Francisco based lithographer active in the first decades of the 20th century. Chevalier is a remarkably elusive figure and little is known of his personal or professional life. He is best known for his large and magnificent topographical map of San Francisco boldly known as 'The Chevalier.' His few other maps also, almost exclusively, focus on San Francisco and the surrounding communities.” geographicus.com

wired.com

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E50 - Pan Pacific International Exposition (PPIE)
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E50 - SF 1906 Earthquake at Grant and Post Avenues

E50 SF 1906 Earthquake at Grant and Post Avenues

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1906_San_Francisco_e...

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E50 - 1906 San Francisco Burn Area

“A map of the area of San Francisco burned in the 1906 earthquake, with a overlay half-toned in red of the dramatic fire. The map appears to have been derived from one published in Leslie's Magazine shortly after the earthquake. See ID #1154, "Destruction of One of the Greatest Modern Cities" (1906). A comparison of these two images shows how the use of color and graphics can dramatically change the impact of a map. Despite the sensationalist impression conveyed by Lee's map, the text legend ("Plain Facts") emphasizes that "the beautiful Golden Gate city" has not been "entirely destroyed" and the "new San Francisco will be grander and more beautiful." See also ID #1155, "Ideal Picture and Map of San Francisco," 1906. This map is tipped into the front of Searight's book, published by the publishers of the map, Laird & Lee. However, the map is mentioned nowhere in the book, nor does it appear in the lengthy "List of Illustrations" in the book. It appears that the map was added after publication, which explains why it is found only in a small number of copies. Red is often used to emphasize the significance of fire or other hazards.” PJ Mode

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E50 Map of Cruise 7

E50 Map of Cruise 7

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E37 - San Francisco, by Harrison Godwin, 1927

“Unlike many other antique maps of San Francisco, this one is covered in illustrations highlighting points of interest and historical events. The streets are essentially the same and they’re all labeled well enough that you can see if your apartment used to be a cemetery, a slaughterhouse, or an old railroad car barn. The map was originally mass-produced for tourists and I’ve seen a few different copies online. One was found in the forgotten depths of someone’s closet in 2011, and a Redditor mentioned in the comment thread that they had an original framed copy on their wall at home. In 2012, a copy of the map sold on eBay for $1,400.” The Bold Italic

“Harrison Godwin (1899 - 1984) was an American cartoonist and hotelier active in California during the early to middle parts of the 20th century. Harrison was a cartoonist with the Los Angeles Examiner and published two daily strips. With regard to cartographic material he published just three maps, San Francisco, Hollywood and North America, all between the years of 1927 and 1929. The San Francisco and Hollywood maps were first and second maps in a planned series of American cities, each taking some three months to complete. Curiously, no further maps in the series materialized. In addition to his cartoon work Harrison, in partnership with his brother Fred, owned Carmel's La Playa Hotel, where Harrison worked as a manager. Harrison and Fred Godwin and are credited with popularizing Carmel as a tourist destination. Little else is known of his life.” geographicus.com

davidrumsey.com

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E50 - San Francisco Butler 1864

ct

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E50 - 1937 Views of Future Site of SF Giants Ballpark
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E50 - SF Giants Ballpark on Google Maps Satellite

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E50 - SF Giants Baseball Stadium Development 8

SF Giants Baseball Stadium Development 8

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E50 - Construction

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E50 - The Coke Bottle

Upper middle, upper right: San Francisco Giants (Chris Koenig)

Upper left, lower middle, lower right: https://scientificartstudio.com/san-francisco-gian...

Lower left: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Park

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E50 - A Ballpark Connected To The Water

Upper right: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCovey_Cove

Upper left, lower middle, lower right: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oracle_Park

Lower left: SF Giants (Chris Koenig, Brad Martens, Suzanna Mitchell)

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E50 - McCovey Cove Night Game at Oracle Ballpark SF Giants
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E50 Map of Cruise 8

E50 Map of Cruise 8

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E50 - SF Giants Ballpark view of Bay
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E50 - SF Giants Slide with Logo 2

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