Larmessin Whimsical Costumes of Professions - Rich Breiman Collection - Curated by Gabrielle Ly

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18555
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18555

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18556
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18556

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18557
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18557

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18558
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18558

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18559
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18559

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18560
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18560

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18561
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18561

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18562
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18562

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18563
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18563

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18564
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18564

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18565
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18565

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18567
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18567

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E443 various Rich Breiman - i18568
E443 various Rich Breiman - i18568
Image 1 of 13 | e443 | i17289 | 7938x11104px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18555

Furs were an important part of the French economy during the 17th century. Colonists in New France traded with indigenous North Americans for the pelts of hunted animals, which would have been made into clothing by furriers.

Fur Trade - Canadian Museum of Natural History

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Image 2 of 13 | e443 | i17290 | 7965x11103px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18556

Armed with a variety of kitchen equipment and cutlery, this cook also adorns himself with platters of fruit and meat. While the meal of pork and chicken would be unattainable for the impoverished and too-plain for the wealthy, the food offered by the cook suits middle class French taste. 

French Peasantry, French Cuisine
 

VOICE NOTE TRANSCRIPT:

These prints are “productively positioned between the fantastic and lived experience” according to David Pullins, a curator at the Metropolitan Museum. Created by a tradesman like Larmessin, the portraits ought to be seen in reference to his time (representing trades, fashions, and culture) and referring to the art world. The portraits walk a fine line, in tension between two opposing worlds. To the viewer, this collection deals with familiar materials of French life, though framed like an ethnographic print.

The cook, or the cuisinier, is portrayed like an alien, unlike the rest of society. This distanced perspective gives the viewer greater insight into how these trades were viewed, especially in service to the higher classes.  

1
Image 3 of 13 | e443 | i17291 | 7952x11056px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18557

Following the Renaissance, scientific pursuits led to many developments in winemaking. Regions and grape types were becoming recognized and associated with quality. The oldest vineyards with the most respected names sold at high prices to the upper class, though there was still a strong presence of cheap wines.

Wine and France: A Brief History - Cambridge University Press

0
Image 4 of 13 | e443 | i17292 | 7819x11026px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18558

Horses were ridden for leisure, transportation and combat in the 17th century. A suitable sattle was therefore important.

Equestrian Culture in France

0
Image 5 of 13 | e443 | i17293 | 7970x11088px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18559

The hosier makes knitted and woven goods: depicted here are socks, stockings, gloves, mittens, and hats. Hand-knitting was a time-consuming process, but their products were staples of a French wardrobe.

Fashion History

 

VOICE NOTE TRANSCRIPT:

Others, like the le hosier, or someone who makes knitwear, appear more upper class and elite due to the economic standing needed to buy his wares. Indeed, his tools and materials, such as clothing and scissors, seem more familiar to us and present something more comforting and less alien.

1
Image 6 of 13 | e443 | i17294 | 7844x11078px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18560

Bread was an incredibly important product, as it remains today. Most bread in the 17th century would have been leavened with sourdough, but by 1644, pain à la reine (bread in the Queen’s style, referring to Marie de Medici), leavened with yeast, also grew popular.

 

French Bread History

0
Image 7 of 13 | e443 | i17295 | 7968x11056px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18561

Habit de Caffetier 

Coffeehouses presented a respectable place for the middle class to socialize, one that was not exclusive. These houses became centers of criticism and discussion, frequented by writers and great thinkers. Most cities had a few dozen locations (Paris claimed a few hundred). 

Source: "Coffeehouses and Cafes" from the Oxford Reference 

For further reading: Symbols of Behaviour in mid-17th Century English Coffee Houses by Scott Shriner 

0
Image 8 of 13 | e443 | i17296 | 7972x11050px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18562

Habit de Vannier

Basketmakers often grew their own materials, such as willow and straw. The French favored willow since it came in so many different shapes, sizes, and colors. Now, only a few hundred basketmakers exist in France. 

The basketmaker here is adorned in a variety of baskets used for utilitarian purposes, other than the bird headdress. 

For more information about French basketmaking: Basketry in Villaines les rochers - France - The culture, the Know-how of basket makers

The History of Basket Weaving 

 

VOICE NOTE TRANSCRIPT:

Each of these images feature a different profession. Interestingly, each tradesperson is portrayed in a ballet position similar to that of King Louis, or the Sun King, of France. Larmessin’s portrait combines the influence of ballet costumes with the working class trades, portraying them in a fanciful documentary style. 
 

1
Image 9 of 13 | e443 | i17297 | 7954x11027px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18563

Habit de Boucher

The butcher was an essential part of the lower-class community. Here, he is seemingly styled like Hercules, a mythical figure known for his 12 feats of strength and often arrayed in a lion's skin and with a club. The butcher even holds a club like Hercules here. 

 

Source: Le Boucher | The Butcher 

 

VOICE NOTE TRANSCRIPT:

Other trades offer classical references, such as the Le Boucher. The butcher wears a cow’s head and skin and holds a club, seemingly portrayed like the great mythological hero Hercules. The use of the “Hercules” type crafts an image of a heavy-handed strongman with a stomach for blood. 

1
Image 10 of 13 | e443 | i17298 | 7996x11112px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18564

Habit de Masson

The masons represented the history of great monumental architecture, for example, think of cathedrals like Notre Dame and Chartres. 

The recent fire at Notre Dame and its renovation has revived the interest in the masonry trade. 

For further reading: https://www.npr.org/2019/07/20/743010875/notre-dame-fire-revives-demand-for-skilled-stone-carvers-in-france 

0
Image 11 of 13 | e443 | i17299 | 7986x11056px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18565

Habit de laboureur

Ploughmen formed the majority of French society, making up the lower classes. They were mostly self-sufficient, growing enough food to meet their needs with any excess going to the market for other needs they could not meet, like pottery or metalwork. 

For further reading:

Le Laboureur | The Ploughman 

0
Image 12 of 13 | e443 | i17300 | 7936x11064px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18567

Habit de Serrurier

They often resembled blacksmiths with their shared metal working focus. Locks were often used to deter robbers and theft, with more than one often installed on a door. 

For more information: Le Serrurier | The Locksmith  

0
Image 13 of 13 | e443 | i17301 | 7934x11062px E443 various Rich Breiman - i18568
1

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18555

Furs were an important part of the French economy during the 17th century. Colonists in New France traded with indigenous North Americans for the pelts of hunted animals, which would have been made into clothing by furriers.

Fur Trade - Canadian Museum of Natural History

0
Image 1 of 13
e443
i17289
7938x11104px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18556

Armed with a variety of kitchen equipment and cutlery, this cook also adorns himself with platters of fruit and meat. While the meal of pork and chicken would be unattainable for the impoverished and too-plain for the wealthy, the food offered by the cook suits middle class French taste. 

French Peasantry, French Cuisine
 

VOICE NOTE TRANSCRIPT:

These prints are “productively positioned between the fantastic and lived experience” according to David Pullins, a curator at the Metropolitan Museum. Created by a tradesman like Larmessin, the portraits ought to be seen in reference to his time (representing trades, fashions, and culture) and referring to the art world. The portraits walk a fine line, in tension between two opposing worlds. To the viewer, this collection deals with familiar materials of French life, though framed like an ethnographic print.

The cook, or the cuisinier, is portrayed like an alien, unlike the rest of society. This distanced perspective gives the viewer greater insight into how these trades were viewed, especially in service to the higher classes.  

1
Image 2 of 13
e443
i17290
7965x11103px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18557

Following the Renaissance, scientific pursuits led to many developments in winemaking. Regions and grape types were becoming recognized and associated with quality. The oldest vineyards with the most respected names sold at high prices to the upper class, though there was still a strong presence of cheap wines.

Wine and France: A Brief History - Cambridge University Press

0
Image 3 of 13
e443
i17291
7952x11056px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18558

Horses were ridden for leisure, transportation and combat in the 17th century. A suitable sattle was therefore important.

Equestrian Culture in France

0
Image 4 of 13
e443
i17292
7819x11026px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18559

The hosier makes knitted and woven goods: depicted here are socks, stockings, gloves, mittens, and hats. Hand-knitting was a time-consuming process, but their products were staples of a French wardrobe.

Fashion History

 

VOICE NOTE TRANSCRIPT:

Others, like the le hosier, or someone who makes knitwear, appear more upper class and elite due to the economic standing needed to buy his wares. Indeed, his tools and materials, such as clothing and scissors, seem more familiar to us and present something more comforting and less alien.

1
Image 5 of 13
e443
i17293
7970x11088px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18560

Bread was an incredibly important product, as it remains today. Most bread in the 17th century would have been leavened with sourdough, but by 1644, pain à la reine (bread in the Queen’s style, referring to Marie de Medici), leavened with yeast, also grew popular.

 

French Bread History

0
Image 6 of 13
e443
i17294
7844x11078px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18561

Habit de Caffetier 

Coffeehouses presented a respectable place for the middle class to socialize, one that was not exclusive. These houses became centers of criticism and discussion, frequented by writers and great thinkers. Most cities had a few dozen locations (Paris claimed a few hundred). 

Source: "Coffeehouses and Cafes" from the Oxford Reference 

For further reading: Symbols of Behaviour in mid-17th Century English Coffee Houses by Scott Shriner 

0
Image 7 of 13
e443
i17295
7968x11056px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18562

Habit de Vannier

Basketmakers often grew their own materials, such as willow and straw. The French favored willow since it came in so many different shapes, sizes, and colors. Now, only a few hundred basketmakers exist in France. 

The basketmaker here is adorned in a variety of baskets used for utilitarian purposes, other than the bird headdress. 

For more information about French basketmaking: Basketry in Villaines les rochers - France - The culture, the Know-how of basket makers

The History of Basket Weaving 

 

VOICE NOTE TRANSCRIPT:

Each of these images feature a different profession. Interestingly, each tradesperson is portrayed in a ballet position similar to that of King Louis, or the Sun King, of France. Larmessin’s portrait combines the influence of ballet costumes with the working class trades, portraying them in a fanciful documentary style. 
 

1
Image 8 of 13
e443
i17296
7972x11050px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18563

Habit de Boucher

The butcher was an essential part of the lower-class community. Here, he is seemingly styled like Hercules, a mythical figure known for his 12 feats of strength and often arrayed in a lion's skin and with a club. The butcher even holds a club like Hercules here. 

 

Source: Le Boucher | The Butcher 

 

VOICE NOTE TRANSCRIPT:

Other trades offer classical references, such as the Le Boucher. The butcher wears a cow’s head and skin and holds a club, seemingly portrayed like the great mythological hero Hercules. The use of the “Hercules” type crafts an image of a heavy-handed strongman with a stomach for blood. 

1
Image 9 of 13
e443
i17297
7954x11027px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18564

Habit de Masson

The masons represented the history of great monumental architecture, for example, think of cathedrals like Notre Dame and Chartres. 

The recent fire at Notre Dame and its renovation has revived the interest in the masonry trade. 

For further reading: https://www.npr.org/2019/07/20/743010875/notre-dame-fire-revives-demand-for-skilled-stone-carvers-in-france 

0
Image 10 of 13
e443
i17298
7996x11112px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18565

Habit de laboureur

Ploughmen formed the majority of French society, making up the lower classes. They were mostly self-sufficient, growing enough food to meet their needs with any excess going to the market for other needs they could not meet, like pottery or metalwork. 

For further reading:

Le Laboureur | The Ploughman 

0
Image 11 of 13
e443
i17299
7986x11056px

E443 various Rich Breiman - i18567

Habit de Serrurier

They often resembled blacksmiths with their shared metal working focus. Locks were often used to deter robbers and theft, with more than one often installed on a door. 

For more information: Le Serrurier | The Locksmith  

0
Image 12 of 13
e443
i17300
7936x11064px
Dots count
2

Dot stories


1
tomadmin
(@tomadmin)
Jan 05 2024
0.24
0.29
2
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 05 2024
0.18
1.14
Dots count
2

Dot stories


1
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 05 2024
0.19
1.13
2
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 05 2024
0.57
0.18
Dots count
4

Dot stories


1
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 05 2024
0.19
1.12
2
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 05 2024
0.58
0.37
3
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.74
0.46
4
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.62
0.54
Dots count
5

Dot stories


1
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 05 2024
0.22
1.14
2
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.46
0.94
3
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.76
0.33
4
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.55
0.2
5
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.19
0.65
Dots count
7

Dot stories


1
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 05 2024
0.19
1.13
2
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.61
0.51
3
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.49
0.65
4
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.16
0.18
5
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.36
0.29
6
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.51
0.3
7
tomadmin
(@tomadmin)
Jan 12 2024
0.76
0.59
Dots count
2

Dot stories


1
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 05 2024
0.18
1.14
2
katharine
(@katharine)
Jan 06 2024
0.22
0.21
Dots count
6

Dot stories


1
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.3
0.43
2
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.44
0.44
3
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.25
1.12
4
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.46
0.19
5
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.5
0.32
6
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.45
0.63
Dots count
3

Dot stories


1
tomadmin
(@tomadmin)
Dec 27 2023
0.75
1.13
2
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.71
0.46
3
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.49
0.27
Dots count
7

Dot stories


1
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.22
1.12
2
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.5
0.66
3
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.46
0.22
4
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.31
0.82
5
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.58
0.47
6
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.38
0.57
7
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.27
0.22
Dots count
8

Dot stories


1
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.26
1.14
2
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.52
0.67
3
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.47
0.64
4
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.33
0.37
5
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.37
1
6
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.6
0.3
7
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.36
0.56
8
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.43
0.47
Dots count
7

Dot stories


1
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.72
0.72
2
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.69
0.35
3
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.2
1.12
4
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.21
0.93
5
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.23
0.63
6
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.46
0.8
7
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.48
0.56
Dots count
7

Dot stories


1
tomadmin
(@tomadmin)
Dec 27 2023
0.78
1.13
2
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 30 2023
0.41
0.75
3
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.61
0.45
4
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.79
0.46
5
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.63
0.31
6
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 04 2024
0.31
0.84
7
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.47
0.53
Dots count
7

Dot stories


1
tomadmin
(@tomadmin)
Dec 27 2023
0.73
1.13
2
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.23
0.54
3
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.42
0.44
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Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Dec 29 2023
0.38
0.76
5
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.4
0.29
6
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.71
0.65
7
Gabrielle Ly
(@gabrielle_ly)
Jan 05 2024
0.54
0.54
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