Paris Transformed

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1620 Paris
1620 Paris

2

1705 Paris
1705 Paris

3

1785 Paris
1785 Paris

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1805 Paris
1805 Paris

5

1811 Paris
1811 Paris

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1823 Paris
1823 Paris

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1834 Paris
1834 Paris

8

1852 Paris
1852 Paris

9

1854 Paris
1854 Paris

10

1865 Paris
1865 Paris

11

1878a Paris
1878a Paris

12

1878b Paris
1878b Paris

13

1852b Paris
1852b Paris

14

1855 Paris
1855 Paris

15

1858 Paris
1858 Paris

16

1860 Paris
1860 Paris

17

1870a Paris
1870a Paris

18

1870b Paris
1870b Paris

19

1876a Paris
1876a Paris

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1876b Paris
1876b Paris

21

1876c Paris
1876c Paris

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1876d Paris
1876d Paris

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1923 Paris Atget Coin Rue de la Colombe
1923 Paris Atget Coin Rue de la Colombe

24

1926 Paris Atget Rue des Reculettes
1926 Paris Atget Rue des Reculettes
Image 1 of 24 | Image: 117 | Size: 10454x8957px 1620 Paris

Parys, wie solche 1620, im Wessen gelanden (1620) Westward facing 1620 panoramic engraving details Paris during the reign King Louis XIII (1601-1610-1643) You can clearly see the cathedral of Nôtre Dame on Île de la Cité as well as windmills in the areas of Belleville and Montmartre to the north of the city (left side of the map). In the foreground, the Palais du Louvre sits centered with one side of its galleries completed along the river Seine. This wing of the palace leads to the now demolished Tuileries Palace that used to overlook the gardens depicted at the bottom of the map. Originally published in Frankfurt, this edition hails from the first Dutch language publication of French geography in the 1660s. / Image: David Rumsey Collection © 2000 by Cartography Associates

https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RU...

0
Image 2 of 24 | Image: 118 | Size: 6946x5633px 1705 Paris

Huitième plan de Paris divisé en ses vingts quartiers (1705) The French King Louis XIV had long had abandoned Paris as the traditional home of the monarch in favor of his father's hunting lodge a day's ride from the capital. This 1705 map of Paris is the last of a multi-volume publication Traité de la police (1707-1738) written by Paris Police Commissioner Nicolas de la Mare (1639-1723) where he also catalogued new police methods used to quell riots in the city. Even though historians have noted inaccuracies within the maps created for Traité de la police, this eight-map series shows the growth of Paris from the Roman era. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.

https://www.loc.gov/item/2001620493/

0
Image 3 of 24 | Image: 119 | Size: 5000x3473px 1785 Paris
Carte des environs de Paris (1785) Completed prior to the French Revolution, this map shows the city limits of "Old Paris" as well as key features that would become encircled by Napoleon III in the next century. Look to the west of Paris to see the Bois de Boulogne that Baron Haussmann would expand and improve to create a public park for the capital akin to London's Hyde Park, which he greatly admired. At the bottom left corner, the town of Chartres boasts a cathedral that is the best example of medieval gothic architecture in Europe to this day. / Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.
0
Image 4 of 24 | Image: 120 | Size: 7172x5542px 1805 Paris
Plan de la ville de Paris avec ses environs (1805) Austrian engarver Johann Spiegl created this map during the reign of Emperor Napoleon I. Clear detail of Paris, its fortifications, city walls and nearby woods. Note the École militaire is now within the walls of the city whereas it resided outside in the 1705 map. Relief shown by hachures, titles in German and French with place names in French. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
0
Image 5 of 24 | Image: 121 | Size: 10000x5895px 1811 Paris

Created during the reign of Emperor Napoleon I, this 1811 map crisply details "Old Paris" before the Emperor's nephew, Napoleon III would alter the landscape of city into the modern capital we know today. The Louvre north gallery is not completed yet and Île de La Cité remains crowded, especially in front of Cathedral of Nôtre Dame. / Courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

https://rosettaapp.getty.edu/delivery/DeliveryMana...

0
Image 6 of 24 | Image: 124 | Size: 14428x8799px 1823 Paris

Plan routier de la ville de Paris et des ses faubourgs (1823) Under the French Restoration (1814-1830), note the increase in size of the Halle aux Vins in 5th arrondiesment, just north of the Jardin du Roi which is now known as the Jardin des Plantes. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g5834p.ct003571

0
Image 7 of 24 | Image: 122 | Size: 8518x6374px 1834 Paris
This is one of the many maps published by the British based Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1826-1848) whose aim was to provide information to the working and middle classes. Here we have a detailed map of Paris representing the era of the July Monarchy (1830-1848). Constitutional monarch Louis-Philippe ruled during the 1832 cholera outbreak when Paris lost 20,000 out of 650,000 inhabitants within the capital. A second epidemic would hit France in 1849, just after the revolution of 1848 and the establishment of the Second Republic. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
0
Image 8 of 24 | Image: 126 | Size: 16813x11979px 1852 Paris
This is an interesting piece because it was originally drawn by Henry-Charles Emmery (1789-1842) in 1833 after the cholera epidemic in France. This map was revisted twice, using additional plans from 1837 and then finally 1852 at the begining of Napoleon III's reign and Haussmann's appointment to spearhead the transformation of Paris. / Image courtesy of David Rumsey Collection © 2000 by Cartography Associates
0
Image 9 of 24 | Image: 123 | Size: 8000x5793px 1854 Paris
Nouveau plan de la ville de Paris (1854) Prior to the first 1855 Paris Univeral Exposition, Napoleon III attended the successful 1851 Great Exhibition in London. Motivated to show his capital city as the most modern in the world, the Emperor gave Baron Haussmann unprecendented authority to move ahead with the reconstruction of Paris during the Second Empire. / Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.
0
Image 10 of 24 | Image: 116 | Size: 8000x6091px 1865 Paris
Paris instantané : plan à aiguille (1865) A detailed tourist guide and map in anticipation of the Paris Exposition universelle d'art et d'industrie de 1867. Here you can see many of the changes implemented by Napoleon III and Haussmann in time for the second exposition hosted by the Emperor to show off the modernization of his capital city. The Louvre galleries are completed and connect to the Tuileries Palace along the expaned rue de Rivoli with its covered pedestrain arcades, new modern hotel and department stores. The 1867 Exposition ran from April - November and the main site is featured next to the École Militaire. The Arc de Triomphe sits centered at Place de l'Étoile with its twelve spokes radiating outwards into the city. The Avenue des Champs-Élysées flows directly from the Arc de Triomphe with a clear line to Place de la Concorde, the Jardin des Tuileries and Napoleon III's home at the Tuileries Palace. / Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.
0
Image 11 of 24 | Image: 129 | Size: 11248x8272px 1878a Paris
Nouveau Paris monumental : itinéraire pratique de l'étranger dans Paris (1787) Beautiful three-dimensional imagery for this practical itinerary guides visitors through Paris during the Third Republic. Although not drawn to scale, a birds-eye view highlights the legacy of Haussmann and Napoleon III to create more air and light throughout the capital city with broad streets to make key sites more accesible. / Image courtesty of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
0
Image 12 of 24 | Image: 125 | Size: 11737x9070px 1878b Paris
Paris et ses environs (1878) This map shows all twenty arrondisements (neighborhoods) of Paris in their spiral formation from the inner circle outwards, delineated by color. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
0
Image 13 of 24 | Image: 130 | Size: 563x640px 1852b Paris
Rue Tirechape renovated during the Rue de Rivoli construction, now Rue du Pont-Neuf that crosses Rivoli from the Seine straight to Les Halles, Photograph attributed to Charles Marville circa 1852-1853.
0
Image 14 of 24 | Image: 132 | Size: 300x434px 1855 Paris
Rue de Rivoli at the time of the Pairs Exposition Universelle which ran from May to November of 1855. This street was the first project under Haussmann after appointed Prefect of the Seine by Emperor Napoleon III. With sweeping powers to implement construction plans, and only reporting directly to Napeleon himself, Haussmann was able to fund, demolish 800 houses and rebuild this major two mile artery running east-west across the capital city in a short amount of time at an estimated cost of 120 million francs. Photograph by Adolphe Braun (1811-1877).
0
Image 15 of 24 | Image: 131 | Size: 740x482px 1858 Paris
The Emperor's Kiosk (1857) created by Gabriel Davioud as the first structure in the Bois de Boulogne which was a park gifted by Napoleon III to the city of Paris in 1852. Davioud was an important architect, who worked closely with Haussmann, designing all of the Parisian "street furniture" such as kiosks, lamps, benches, fences, monuments, the fountain at Place Saint-Michel and the Théâtre de la Ville, to name a few. This 1858 photograph is by Charles Marville, hired by Haussmann to document the city's transformation.
0
Image 16 of 24 | Image: 133 | Size: 620x829px 1860 Paris
Paris Sewers 1860 represented modern infrastructure that Gaspard-Félix Tournachon (known by the pseudonym, “Nadar”) celebrated in his images.
0
Image 17 of 24 | Image: 134 | Size: 1024x576px 1870a Paris
Boulevard Haussmann, circa 1870, photograph attributed to Charles Marville. Note the tree-lined boulevard, a hallmark of Haussmann's design. He planted over 600,000 trees throughout Paris and the city parks in less than two decades.
0
Image 18 of 24 | Image: 135 | Size: 500x310px 1870b Paris
Rue de Rivoli in 1870, the covered arcades designed for pedestrians to comfortably walk through the city regardless of weather and access shopping, restaurants and hotels. The Jardin des Tuileries is to the left of the image with the Palais du Louvre gallery.
0
Image 19 of 24 | Image: 136 | Size: 1136x640px 1876a Paris
Paris Construction of Avenue de l'Opera by Charles Marville 1876. Note the workers lined across the buildings and rooftops. / Image courtesy of Musée Carnavalet.
0
Image 20 of 24 | Image: 137 | Size: 740x552px 1876b Paris
Paris Construction of Avenue de l'Opera by Charles Marville 1876 / Image courtesy of Musée Carnavalet.
0
Image 21 of 24 | Image: 138 | Size: 740x525px 1876c Paris
Paris Construction of Avenue de l'Opera by Charles Marville 1876. Note the opera house in the distance and the demolition of the surrounding buildings. Haussmann estimated that over 350,000 people were displaced during his time as Prefect. / Image courtesy of Musée Carnavalet.
0
Image 22 of 24 | Image: 139 | Size: 640x475px 1876d Paris
Parisian public urinals, seen here in an 1876 photograph by Charles Marville, helped cement its reputation as the most modern city in the world. / Image courtesy of Musée Carnavalet.
0
Image 23 of 24 | Image: 127 | Size: 2493x2040px 1923 Paris Atget Coin Rue de la Colombe
Eugène Atget (12 February 1857 – 4 August 1927) was a French flâneur and a pioneer of documentary photography, noted for his determination to document all of the architecture and street scenes of Paris before their disappearance to modernization. Most of his photographs were first published by Berenice Abbott after his death. Though he sold his work to artists and craftspeople, and became an inspiration for the surrealists, he did not live to see the wide acclaim his work would eventually receive. / Text: Wikipedia / Image: Sakurako and William Fisher Collection
0
Image 24 of 24 | Image: 128 | Size: 2068x2602px 1926 Paris Atget Rue des Reculettes
Eugène Atget (12 February 1857 – 4 August 1927) was a French flâneur and a pioneer of documentary photography, noted for his determination to document all of the architecture and street scenes of Paris before their disappearance to modernization. Most of his photographs were first published by Berenice Abbott after his death. Though he sold his work to artists and craftspeople, and became an inspiration for the surrealists, he did not live to see the wide acclaim his work would eventually receive. / Text: Wikipedia / Image: Sakurako and William Fisher Collection
0
1620 Paris

Parys, wie solche 1620, im Wessen gelanden (1620) Westward facing 1620 panoramic engraving details Paris during the reign King Louis XIII (1601-1610-1643) You can clearly see the cathedral of Nôtre Dame on Île de la Cité as well as windmills in the areas of Belleville and Montmartre to the north of the city (left side of the map). In the foreground, the Palais du Louvre sits centered with one side of its galleries completed along the river Seine. This wing of the palace leads to the now demolished Tuileries Palace that used to overlook the gardens depicted at the bottom of the map. Originally published in Frankfurt, this edition hails from the first Dutch language publication of French geography in the 1660s. / Image: David Rumsey Collection © 2000 by Cartography Associates

https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RU...

0
Image 1 of 24
Image: 117
Size: 10454x8957px
1705 Paris

Huitième plan de Paris divisé en ses vingts quartiers (1705) The French King Louis XIV had long had abandoned Paris as the traditional home of the monarch in favor of his father's hunting lodge a day's ride from the capital. This 1705 map of Paris is the last of a multi-volume publication Traité de la police (1707-1738) written by Paris Police Commissioner Nicolas de la Mare (1639-1723) where he also catalogued new police methods used to quell riots in the city. Even though historians have noted inaccuracies within the maps created for Traité de la police, this eight-map series shows the growth of Paris from the Roman era. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.

https://www.loc.gov/item/2001620493/

0
Image 2 of 24
Image: 118
Size: 6946x5633px
1785 Paris
Carte des environs de Paris (1785) Completed prior to the French Revolution, this map shows the city limits of "Old Paris" as well as key features that would become encircled by Napoleon III in the next century. Look to the west of Paris to see the Bois de Boulogne that Baron Haussmann would expand and improve to create a public park for the capital akin to London's Hyde Park, which he greatly admired. At the bottom left corner, the town of Chartres boasts a cathedral that is the best example of medieval gothic architecture in Europe to this day. / Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.
0
Image 3 of 24
Image: 119
Size: 5000x3473px
1805 Paris
Plan de la ville de Paris avec ses environs (1805) Austrian engarver Johann Spiegl created this map during the reign of Emperor Napoleon I. Clear detail of Paris, its fortifications, city walls and nearby woods. Note the École militaire is now within the walls of the city whereas it resided outside in the 1705 map. Relief shown by hachures, titles in German and French with place names in French. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
0
Image 4 of 24
Image: 120
Size: 7172x5542px
1811 Paris

Created during the reign of Emperor Napoleon I, this 1811 map crisply details "Old Paris" before the Emperor's nephew, Napoleon III would alter the landscape of city into the modern capital we know today. The Louvre north gallery is not completed yet and Île de La Cité remains crowded, especially in front of Cathedral of Nôtre Dame. / Courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.

https://rosettaapp.getty.edu/delivery/DeliveryMana...

0
Image 5 of 24
Image: 121
Size: 10000x5895px
1823 Paris

Plan routier de la ville de Paris et des ses faubourgs (1823) Under the French Restoration (1814-1830), note the increase in size of the Halle aux Vins in 5th arrondiesment, just north of the Jardin du Roi which is now known as the Jardin des Plantes. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.

http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g5834p.ct003571

0
Image 6 of 24
Image: 124
Size: 14428x8799px
1834 Paris
This is one of the many maps published by the British based Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1826-1848) whose aim was to provide information to the working and middle classes. Here we have a detailed map of Paris representing the era of the July Monarchy (1830-1848). Constitutional monarch Louis-Philippe ruled during the 1832 cholera outbreak when Paris lost 20,000 out of 650,000 inhabitants within the capital. A second epidemic would hit France in 1849, just after the revolution of 1848 and the establishment of the Second Republic. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
0
Image 7 of 24
Image: 122
Size: 8518x6374px
1852 Paris
This is an interesting piece because it was originally drawn by Henry-Charles Emmery (1789-1842) in 1833 after the cholera epidemic in France. This map was revisted twice, using additional plans from 1837 and then finally 1852 at the begining of Napoleon III's reign and Haussmann's appointment to spearhead the transformation of Paris. / Image courtesy of David Rumsey Collection © 2000 by Cartography Associates
0
Image 8 of 24
Image: 126
Size: 16813x11979px
1854 Paris
Nouveau plan de la ville de Paris (1854) Prior to the first 1855 Paris Univeral Exposition, Napoleon III attended the successful 1851 Great Exhibition in London. Motivated to show his capital city as the most modern in the world, the Emperor gave Baron Haussmann unprecendented authority to move ahead with the reconstruction of Paris during the Second Empire. / Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.
0
Image 9 of 24
Image: 123
Size: 8000x5793px
1865 Paris
Paris instantané : plan à aiguille (1865) A detailed tourist guide and map in anticipation of the Paris Exposition universelle d'art et d'industrie de 1867. Here you can see many of the changes implemented by Napoleon III and Haussmann in time for the second exposition hosted by the Emperor to show off the modernization of his capital city. The Louvre galleries are completed and connect to the Tuileries Palace along the expaned rue de Rivoli with its covered pedestrain arcades, new modern hotel and department stores. The 1867 Exposition ran from April - November and the main site is featured next to the École Militaire. The Arc de Triomphe sits centered at Place de l'Étoile with its twelve spokes radiating outwards into the city. The Avenue des Champs-Élysées flows directly from the Arc de Triomphe with a clear line to Place de la Concorde, the Jardin des Tuileries and Napoleon III's home at the Tuileries Palace. / Digital image courtesy of the Getty's Open Content Program.
0
Image 10 of 24
Image: 116
Size: 8000x6091px
1878a Paris
Nouveau Paris monumental : itinéraire pratique de l'étranger dans Paris (1787) Beautiful three-dimensional imagery for this practical itinerary guides visitors through Paris during the Third Republic. Although not drawn to scale, a birds-eye view highlights the legacy of Haussmann and Napoleon III to create more air and light throughout the capital city with broad streets to make key sites more accesible. / Image courtesty of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
0
Image 11 of 24
Image: 129
Size: 11248x8272px
1878b Paris
Paris et ses environs (1878) This map shows all twenty arrondisements (neighborhoods) of Paris in their spiral formation from the inner circle outwards, delineated by color. / Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
0
Image 12 of 24
Image: 125
Size: 11737x9070px
1852b Paris
Rue Tirechape renovated during the Rue de Rivoli construction, now Rue du Pont-Neuf that crosses Rivoli from the Seine straight to Les Halles, Photograph attributed to Charles Marville circa 1852-1853.
0
Image 13 of 24
Image: 130
Size: 563x640px
1855 Paris
Rue de Rivoli at the time of the Pairs Exposition Universelle which ran from May to November of 1855. This street was the first project under Haussmann after appointed Prefect of the Seine by Emperor Napoleon III. With sweeping powers to implement construction plans, and only reporting directly to Napeleon himself, Haussmann was able to fund, demolish 800 houses and rebuild this major two mile artery running east-west across the capital city in a short amount of time at an estimated cost of 120 million francs. Photograph by Adolphe Braun (1811-1877).
0
Image 14 of 24
Image: 132
Size: 300x434px
1858 Paris
The Emperor's Kiosk (1857) created by Gabriel Davioud as the first structure in the Bois de Boulogne which was a park gifted by Napoleon III to the city of Paris in 1852. Davioud was an important architect, who worked closely with Haussmann, designing all of the Parisian "street furniture" such as kiosks, lamps, benches, fences, monuments, the fountain at Place Saint-Michel and the Théâtre de la Ville, to name a few. This 1858 photograph is by Charles Marville, hired by Haussmann to document the city's transformation.
0
Image 15 of 24
Image: 131
Size: 740x482px
1860 Paris
Paris Sewers 1860 represented modern infrastructure that Gaspard-Félix Tournachon (known by the pseudonym, “Nadar”) celebrated in his images.
0
Image 16 of 24
Image: 133
Size: 620x829px
1870a Paris
Boulevard Haussmann, circa 1870, photograph attributed to Charles Marville. Note the tree-lined boulevard, a hallmark of Haussmann's design. He planted over 600,000 trees throughout Paris and the city parks in less than two decades.
0
Image 17 of 24
Image: 134
Size: 1024x576px
1870b Paris
Rue de Rivoli in 1870, the covered arcades designed for pedestrians to comfortably walk through the city regardless of weather and access shopping, restaurants and hotels. The Jardin des Tuileries is to the left of the image with the Palais du Louvre gallery.
0
Image 18 of 24
Image: 135
Size: 500x310px
1876a Paris
Paris Construction of Avenue de l'Opera by Charles Marville 1876. Note the workers lined across the buildings and rooftops. / Image courtesy of Musée Carnavalet.
0
Image 19 of 24
Image: 136
Size: 1136x640px
1876b Paris
Paris Construction of Avenue de l'Opera by Charles Marville 1876 / Image courtesy of Musée Carnavalet.
0
Image 20 of 24
Image: 137
Size: 740x552px
1876c Paris
Paris Construction of Avenue de l'Opera by Charles Marville 1876. Note the opera house in the distance and the demolition of the surrounding buildings. Haussmann estimated that over 350,000 people were displaced during his time as Prefect. / Image courtesy of Musée Carnavalet.
0
Image 21 of 24
Image: 138
Size: 740x525px
1876d Paris
Parisian public urinals, seen here in an 1876 photograph by Charles Marville, helped cement its reputation as the most modern city in the world. / Image courtesy of Musée Carnavalet.
0
Image 22 of 24
Image: 139
Size: 640x475px
1923 Paris Atget Coin Rue de la Colombe
Eugène Atget (12 February 1857 – 4 August 1927) was a French flâneur and a pioneer of documentary photography, noted for his determination to document all of the architecture and street scenes of Paris before their disappearance to modernization. Most of his photographs were first published by Berenice Abbott after his death. Though he sold his work to artists and craftspeople, and became an inspiration for the surrealists, he did not live to see the wide acclaim his work would eventually receive. / Text: Wikipedia / Image: Sakurako and William Fisher Collection
0
Image 23 of 24
Image: 127
Size: 2493x2040px
1926 Paris Atget Rue des Reculettes
Eugène Atget (12 February 1857 – 4 August 1927) was a French flâneur and a pioneer of documentary photography, noted for his determination to document all of the architecture and street scenes of Paris before their disappearance to modernization. Most of his photographs were first published by Berenice Abbott after his death. Though he sold his work to artists and craftspeople, and became an inspiration for the surrealists, he did not live to see the wide acclaim his work would eventually receive. / Text: Wikipedia / Image: Sakurako and William Fisher Collection
0
Image 24 of 24
Image: 128
Size: 2068x2602px
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